Pack Your Bins

A report from our Spanish correspondent (aka Doug Bickley)

I remembered on this holiday to Gran Canaria to pack some binoculars.  I chose my trusty old Tasco 40mm 8-16x zoom which to my mind are a good compromise between light gathering power and portability.  I also took a lightweight tripod. [Pic 1 & 2]

Pic 1 - Tasco 40mm 8-16x zoom
Pic 1 – Tasco 40mm 8-16x zoom
Pic 2 - Binoculars on a lightweight tripod
Pic 2 – Binoculars on a lightweight tripod


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Obituary: Neville Goodger

From daughter Karen Kendall, on behalf of her mother Shirley, sisters Lynne and Kathryn, grandchildren Richard, Bethany, Jamie and Charlotte, and other members of Neville’s family.

Ronald Neville Goodger
Ronald Neville Goodger

Neville was a remarkable man who was loved by his family and friends. He was born on 29th September 1926 in Fallings Park in Wolverhampton. He was the younger of two children and born into what history now calls the silent generation. It was commonly understood and expected that children should be seen and not heard, this was likely as a consequence of the serious times and everyone’s pre-occupation with ongoing world events

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Trysull Observation Session Thursday 13th September 2018

By Richard Harvey

With Mars at its closest approach since 2003, and the prospect of a clear sky to view it, a last-minute observation session was hastily arranged for Thursday 13th September at our Trysull observation site. I took the society’s 12” dobsonian reflecting telescope (the Tom Collier Telescope), and several other members turned up, all hoping to get a fine display of planets.

The Moon was a waxing crescent in the west as we arrived, lit around 20%. Once the scope was set up, we all enjoyed fine views of the shimmering lunar landscape. I was particularly interested in the small craters in Mare Crisium, which were very noticeable. Crater Picard is 21 miles across, and Pierce is only 12 miles across, we could see them quite clearly. They will soon be washed out with sunlight and not viewable for another month. Quite distinct tonight, on the edge of Mare Crisium, was the distinct dramatic rises of Cape Cape Lavinium and Cape Olivium. 
To the left of the Moon, lower, just heading towards the trees, we saw Jupiter. With the sky not yet dark, the cloud belts were faint, but three of the moons were visible. The brightest, Ganymede, to the telescopic left. Although we could see only three moons, checking later with the Jovian Moon chart in Astronomy Now, all four should have been visible. Dimmer Callisto must have been lost to the twilight sky.

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